Why Your Restaurant’s Sink Is Not Performing Well and How to Fix It

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Restaurants use their sinks on a constant basis, which can lead to a wide variety of problems. Learn about the most common issues that develop with restaurant sinks and what can be done in order to prevent or fix the problems.

Three Common Restaurant Sink Problems and How to Fix Them

When the doors of a restaurant are open for business, the kitchen is in full swing. The restaurant sinks are under heavy use and must be in good working order. If you discover any of these three common restaurant sink issues, try a proven remedy and then call a commercial plumber in Las Vegas if your fix does not solve the problem.

Stiff or Stuck Fixtures

Stiff or stuck fixtures are common issues with restaurant sinks. The extendable sprayer and faucet head may not want to shift between the right and left sides of a sink. This often happens because of mineral buildup. A lime dissolving solution helps to dissolve the mineral buildup on the outside of the fixtures. Rust could also be an issue, and a rusty faucet should be replaced.

Grease Trap Malfunctions

The cooking process creates a lot of liquid grease. Much of this grease ends up going down the kitchen sink. Grease trap malfunctions include clogged traps, which can lead to foul smells. Slow draining sinks are another symptom of a grease trap problem. These issues are best handled by professional plumbers so that you can avoid causing further damage to your restaurant kitchen’s plumbing.

Broken Dishes

Restaurant kitchen sinks need to be durable, which means that they are often made of stainless steel, cast iron or a combination of ceramic and cast iron for aesthetics. The hardness of these materials could lead to a lot of broken dishes. While some broken dishes are a given in the restaurant business, too many can be expensive. To reduce the risk of broken dishes, consider having them loaded onto plastic holding trays that fit into the sink. The bottom of the sink could also be outfitted with a holding tray.

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